Sex/Gender

Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against an employee on the basis of sex in connection with hiring, firing, promotions, demotions, compensation, and other terms and conditions of employment. Title VII also prohibits employers from making employment decisions based on sexual stereotypes. Title VII outlaws sexual harassment including direct requests for sexual favors and harassment that creates a hostile work environment. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 and Title VII require that men and women be given equal pay for equal work. Finally, Title VII makes it unlawful for an employer to retaliate against an employee for complaining about sex discrimination or opposing an employment practice that discriminates based on sex.

Title VII covers employers with 15 or more employees. Similar state and local laws cover employers with fewer employees. A sex discrimination or harassment claim must be initiated by filing a Charge of Discrimination with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") after which the employee may file a lawsuit against the employer in federal court under Title VII. Merrick Law Firm LLC represents women and men asserting sex discrimination or harassment claims with the EEOC and in federal court.

If you believe your employer has discriminated against you at least in part because of your sex, or if you have been subjected to sexual harassment by a supervisor or co-worker, call us at 312.269.0200 or contact us online to discuss your rights.

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