Religion

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 makes it unlawful for employers with 15  or more employees to discriminate against employees because of their religion or religious beliefs.  Title VII’s prohibition against religious discrimination applies to hiring, firing, promotion, demotion, compensation, job assignments, and other terms and conditions of employment.  Similar state and local laws also apply to employers having less than 15 employees.

Under Title VII a covered employer must reasonably accommodate employees’ sincerely held religious practices unless to do so would impose an undue hardship on the employer’s legitimate business operations.  For example, an employer may provide flexible work schedules to allow for prayer in some cases.  Employers must also take reasonable measures to prevent the religious harassment of their employees.  Finally, it is unlawful for employers to retaliate against employees for opposing religious discrimination.  Religious discrimination claims under Title VII must first be filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission before the employee may file suit against the employer in federal court.

If you believe your employer has treated you differently because of your religious beliefs or practices, contact us online or call us at 312.269.0200 to discuss your rights.
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